March 16-Hard Work

March 16-Hard Work

March 16: Hard Work

 

Scripture Lesson: Philippians 2:12-13

 

On this date in 1972, Hall of Fame third baseman Pie Traynor died. Elected to the Hall in 1946, Traynor is often considered to be one of the greatest third basemen of all time. His combination of strong hitting and smooth fielding led his era of baseball. Along with Brooks Robinson and Mike Schmidt, Traynor is considered as one of the top three third basemen ever to play the game. His defensive skills, especially, were honed from many hours of hard work.

 

In today’s passage, Paul was reminding the Philippians that it was important for them to obey and to continue to develop their walk with Christ. Paul reminded them that God was working in each of their lives. I like that concept: God is working in and on you and me. When we allow Him the freedom through His Holy Spirit to mold us and make us, God can accomplish great things for His Kingdom. For God to be successful in working on us, we have to give Him the freedom in our lives to get the job done. The only thing in this world that can stop God from accomplishing His purpose in our lives is our unwillingness to give Him complete control.

  1. What does it mean to you that God is working on you?

  2. Does God have total access and control of our lives? Why or why not?

  3. Ask God what He wants to accomplish through you today and give Him the freedom to make it happen.

What a blessing to know that God is working hard on you and me today. Let’s join His work and make a difference for Him!

 

 

2 comments (Add your own)

1. Stephen wrote:
Have a plastic cup, a hat or sonihtemg else you can put the quarters (or dollars) in, have everyone pitch in a quarter or two and start the cup with one of the people playing.That person holds the cup for the first at-bat of the game. If that players singles or walks, they pull a quarter out of the hat. If the player doubles, he pulls two, triples three and homers, he wins the entire pot.On the flip side, if that player makes an out, the person holding the cup puts a quarter in. If the player strikes out or grounds into a double play, the person holding the cup puts two quarters in.Regardless of what happens, the cup passes to the next person when the at-bat is complete and the process repeats. If at any point the cup is emptied (either from a series of hits or a home run in which the holder wins the entire pot), everyone chips in again and it starts over.Be sure to decide upon some of the more obscure happenings. For instance, if a batter reaches on an error, we've always played it's just a wash and the person passes the cup without taking or putting in.ALTERNATIVE:An alternative way to play is to draft players before the game begins. In this form of the game no money is lost for outs, instead, a person is paid each time his player does sonihtemg positive. Usually a quarter/dollar from each person if his player singles, two if he doubles, etc You can make it as complicated (payments for RBI, runs, etc ) or as simple (just hits) as you'd like.Personally I like the pass-the-cup game better. It's lower maintenance and easy to do even while getting hammered

Mon, May 21, 2012 @ 4:48 AM

2. bhryhqolz wrote:
Wl1T7V zwoqynvggpfv

Wed, May 23, 2012 @ 12:34 PM

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