January 6-Perserverance

January 6-Perserverance

January 6: Perseverance

 

Scripture Lesson: James 1:2-4

 

The Hall of Fame Committee in 1972 elected Early Wynn to be honored. In his 23-year career spanning four decades with the Washington Senators, Cleveland Indians, and the Chicago White Sox, Wynn was well known for his persistence in pitching. He amassed 300 wins with an ERA of 3.54. Wynn also pitched 290 complete games, pitching a total of 4564 innings, while pitching to 19,408 batters striking out 2,334. The seven- time All Star was one who worked hard and made his mark in baseball history.

 

James shows us in today’s lesson that when we are tested in our faith, we develop perseverance. Perseverance is defined as steadfastness in doing something despite great difficulty or delay in achieving success. When we go through tough times in life, we need to realize that those tough times can bring our faith to maturity. Going through tough times can make it hard to be joyful as James tells us to be. When we have the faith that sustains us through the difficult times in life, our faith will mature. The more we mature in our faith, the stronger, more vital, and alive our faith will become.

  1. Reflect on a time when going through tough times made your faith stronger.

  2. Was it easier or harder the next time tough times happened? Why or why not?

  3. How can your perseverance in your faith help others to persevere through their tough times?

Maturity comes in our faith when we persevere no matter what the situation. Even though none of us look forward to challenging times in our lives, James reminds us to realize that tough times help our faith become stronger. Perseverance through tough times is a blessing!

 

 

 

 

 


2 comments (Add your own)

1. Mihail wrote:
This week, I've been doing a couple of thgnis. I'm believing for a new car, so I've started looking at ads, to see what type of deals there are and to get pricing options. I've also been looking into how I can increase revenue and decrease any expenditures.I've also been approaching my work, according to Deuteronomy 28. It say that God will bless the works of my hands and what I set my hands to will prosper. I've been approaching my work as if that were true! If we don't believe that, how can it benefit us?

Mon, March 3, 2014 @ 4:23 AM

2. 1wwwcheapinsurancecom.com wrote:
years ago in his book re: saving Chrysler the first time around get out of the ivory towers and on the shop floor, that is where you need to be, otherwise you will have no idea what is going on with your company-it s problems, issues etc. In other words you will not have a clue.Aaron FeuersteinFrom Wikipedia, the free encyclopediaAaron Feuerstein, an Orthodox Jew, (born 1925) was the third-generation owner[1] and CEO of Malden Mills in Lawrence, Massachusetts.When the Malden Mills factory burnt down on December 11, 1995, Feuerstein decided not only to use his insurance money to rebuild it, but to also pay the salaries of all the now-unemployed workers while it was being rebuilt. Feuerstein spent millions keeping all 3,000 employees on the payroll with full benefits for 6 months. By going against common CEO business practices, especially at a time when most companies were downsizing and moving overseas, he achieved a small degree of fame.Feuerstein claimed that he couldn t have taken another course of action due to his study of the Talmud and the lessons he learnt there: I have a responsibility to the worker, both blue-collar and white-collar. I have an equal responsibility to the community. It would have been unconscionable to put 3,000 people on the streets and deliver a deathblow to the cities of Lawrence and Methuen. Maybe on paper our company is worthless to Wall Street, but I can tell you it s worth more. —(Parade Magazine, 1996)While it would cost Aaron Feuerstein $25,000,000 to do the right thing as well as the turmoil of a November 2001 filing for chapter 11 bankruptcy protection, it appears that applied ethics in business has positive consequences as Malden Mills continues to garner lucrative Department of Defense (DOD) contracts for smart products that interweave fiber optic cabling, electronic biosensors, and USB ports into polar fleece fabric. Malden Mills was awarded a $16 million dollar DOD contract in 2006[2].Feuerstein is an alumnus of Camp Modin in Belgrade, Maine. and was the keynote speaker at the 75th annual reunion in 1997. Feuerstein is a member of Young Israel of Brookline.Industrialist and philanthropist for setting the standard for commitment to employees following a devastating fire at his Malden Mills manufacturing plant. He was awarded the Peace Abbey Courage of Conscience Award on March 13, 1998

Thu, March 13, 2014 @ 1:23 AM

Add a New Comment


code
 

Comment Guidelines: No HTML is allowed. Off-topic or inappropriate comments will be edited or deleted. Thanks.